WOMEN BEHIND CANADIAN TV ALEYSA YOUNG

center_img Sometimes big breaks can happen when we least expect them to or even are aware they are happening. That was certainly the case for director Aleysa Young who, thanks to the kindness of a friend, found herself unknowingly interviewing for the directing job during Baroness Von Sketch’s first season. Young ended up directing all six episodes of the CBC sketch comedy’s first season, even winning a Director’s Guild of Canada award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy for her work. Since that break on Baroness, Young has went on to direct episodes of Workin’ Moms and Kim’s Convenience, for which she was nominated for a Canadian Screen Award in Best Direction, Comedy.Young recently spoke with The TV Junkies as part of our Women Behind Canadian TV series to discuss her path of becoming an award-winning director. She shared with us her experience as a person of color working behind the scenes, and how she started off in casting before moving to directing commercials and then Baroness. Young also talked about she wants to see more diverse stories being told and more diversity on screen as well as off.The TV Junkies: Tell us a little about your background. Did you know you always wanted to be a director? Advertisement Advertisement Aleysa Young: I got started fairly late in life. I started off as a casting director and before that went to film school for about 2 years before dropping out. I realized I was going to learn more being in the industry than studying it. I wanted to get my hands dirty. I didn’t know yet that I wanted to direct, but knew I wanted to be behind the scenes. When I was a kid I went to a live taping of a sitcom and that was the first time I realized TV doesn’t happen live.After dropping out of film school, I moved to Toronto and my first job was as a PA, except that instead of dragging cables, it was a pasta commercial and I basically boiled noodles all day. I really tried to do more on-set stuff, but I had no skills or experience. I ended up getting a job as a casting assistant, where I stayed a few years, but slowly started to work on my own projects with my friends.last_img read more

House Passes Cybercrimes Act

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppKINGSTON, Oct. 14 (JIS): The Cybercrimes Act, which seeks to address computer specific offences, was passed in the House of Representatives on Tuesday (October 13) with two amendments.The new Act will replace the 2010 legislation, and incorporates new offences such as computer-related fraud or forgery; the use of computers for malicious communication; and unauthorised disclosure of investigation.It also addresses the use of the computer for malicious communication.Minister of State in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Julian Robinson, informed that the clause was included “because there is a new phenomenon called cyberbulling.”“This is where persons wilfully send messages, which are designed to annoy, and harass. The data that is sent must be obscene or is menacing in nature. The person sending the data does so intending to cause or is reckless as to whether the sending of the data causes annoyance, inconvenience or distress,” he explained.Opposition Spokesperson on Information Communications Technology (ICT), Dr. Andrew Wheately, while welcoming the provision to address cyberbulling, said the clause could have the effect of inhibiting use of information communications technology (ICT). “This section has the most far-reaching implications of this Act. The intention of this section is to no doubt reduce the incidence of cyberbullying, which we fully endorse. However, it seems to be completely oblivious to the level of sophistication of the layman technology user,” he said.I am sure that members on both sides of this House will agree that this section cannot stand as is. It cannot be that a person who…. makes a mistake while sending an email, text message or other correspondence could be charged with a crime,” he argued further.Mr. Robinson, in acknowledging the concerns, said Clause 9 Section 1 (b) is to be amended to state that a person commits an offence, if that person wilfully uses a computer to send to another person any data that is obscene or offensive.“I want to assure persons, who may send a message and they think that simply sending a message, which might be a joke, that you will be caught here. That is not what this provision is meant to deal with,” Mr. Robinson said. In closing the debate, Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining,Hon. Phillip Paulwell, noted that offences under the Bill require an act and intent.“We have been faithful to ensure that both aspects are provided for, so no innocent bystander will be caught by this. Nobody, who is engaged in doing ICT business, will be caught by this, as you must have intent to do some wrong and the onus is to establish that the intent has been proven,” Mr. Paulwell said.The legislation will now be sent to the Senate for its approval. Related Items:cybercrimes, dr. andrew wheately, house, passlast_img read more

DOD Opens New Intelligence Campus at Maryland BRAC Site

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) held a ribbon cutting last week at a Bethesda, Md., campus that will house about 3,000 intelligence community employees.The Bethesda site had been the home of offices for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency until 2011 when the agency moved to what is now NGA Campus East at Fort Belvoir, Va. The 2005 round of BRAC called for the agency to consolidate multiple sites, primarily in the Maryland and Virginia suburbs of Washington, to Fort Belvoir.By preserving existing structures, the new intelligence facility in Bethesda was built for about 60 percent of the cost of new construction, reported Government Executive. The new building is a “sleek glass façade that wraps around the three pre-existing buildings to create a unified modern structure that centralizes and efficiently distributes mission services,” according to ODNI. A six-story parking garage also was built on the campus, which houses ODNI’s National Counterintelligence and Security Center, the National Intelligence University and the Defense Intelligence Agency.“This facility is — in so many ways — the physical manifestation of ‘intelligence integration,’” Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said at the ribbon cutting.last_img read more