‘Most people don’t really know we’re a thing’: Students, faculty reflect on lack of Native representation at Notre Dame

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the first story in a two-part series examining the ways Native language and cultural identity are being kept alive by the students of Notre Dame. To learn more about their reflections on language and culture, explore these audio and visual clips.While Fr. Edward Sorin and the Congregation of Holy Cross were given the University’s land by the Bishop of Vincennes, this region of Northern Indiana was not uninhabited. “There’s a history of peace, art and culture on this spot that predates Fr. Sorin,” professor Brian S. Collier said. “When Fr. Sorin arrived, there was already a chapel here. The Pokagon Potawatomi was already worshiping here.” If anything, this is what Collier wants students to know about Notre Dame. Collier, a professor and historian with a Ph.D in Native American Studies, spends much of his time trying to ensure Native history does not become a thing of the past. Photo courtest of Alan Mychal Boyd NASAND co-president Alan Mychal Boyd (left) stands next to U.S. Representative Deb Haaland, who is one of two Native American women to ever be elected to U.S. Congress. Boyd and Haaland are pictured attending the Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum.Collier said Catholicism was the commonality that linked Sorin and Leopold Pokagon, the leader of the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi. While it was originally the Pokagon’s ancestral land, Collier said because of this Catholic connection, the Pokagon and the Congregation of the Holy Cross were able to live in relative harmony together on the land. Since 2013, Collier has run the Native American Initiatives (NAI) program at Notre Dame which, he said, initially started as a “faculty book club” for faculty and staff with degrees in Native American history. Soon, however, the program grew to sponsoring community members to come speak on Native issues at Notre Dame. NAI also works with area students from the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi. While the program works to support Native students, whether on campus or in the community, NAI also works as an outreach program for other students who are interested in Native history. Collier said that students often “wonder what they can do to support native causes.” The biggest thing, he said, is becoming aware of whose land they grew up on. “People should come to be aware that there’s been sequential immigration on this very land,” he said. “They’re not the first people there and they won’t be the last people there.” This awareness can translate to getting to know the Native students and Native student groups on campus. “Most people don’t really know we’re a thing,” Alan Mychal Boyd, a Notre Dame senior, said about the Native American Students Association of Notre Dame (NASAND). Boyd, who is the co-president of NASAND, said NASAND is not really supported by the University as a whole, but by the people who work within the University. “A lot of faculty and departments [at Notre Dame], especially the Multicultural Student centers, are awesome,” he said. “I think this is true for any native group on any campus — you have to find your support within certain parts of the University.”But, it can be hard for Native students to find support on campus, especially, Boyd said, since this year there are currently no native faculty that work with NASAND at the University.“That’s one thing that we’ve been really pushing and fighting for this past year…at least one Native faculty member would be amazing,” he said. “It’s important because, one, it shows that we’re here and that we have a person at the University who actually understands where we’re coming from as a whole. But, also, it just makes it so much easier to get things like a Native Studies minor or just better conditions.”The University has debated the induction of a Native American Studies minor for years. Boyd said that a Native American Studies minor would give Native students “a kind of authority,” and give them a chance to learn more about their own individual nations, as well as other Native nations. However, learning about Native nations can be a challenge, Boyd said, especially when so few classes choose to even address the history and contributions of Native nations and Indigenous Peoples. “So, any [class] that’s not specifically about Indigenous people usually doesn’t mention them whatsoever,” he said. “I think the most I got out of a class was our Intro to American Politics — it wasn’t in a lecture, it was in a textbook. All it was was one paragraph summarizing hundreds of years of civil rights and struggles with natives. It didn’t even mention that there were individual Native nations.” Over the years, this representational tension has only been exacerbated by the presence of the 12 Christopher Columbus murals on campus. On Jan. 20, however, it was announced that the University would be covering the murals. But yet, so far this year, the murals still remain uncovered. NASAND co-president junior Mikaela Murphy said that while ultimately she was happy with the decision to cover the murals, she would have appreciated more communication from the administration. “I am very happy with the decision that was made to cover the murals,” she said. “But I think it should have been something more permanent. I think President Jenkins should have thought about us when he made that public announcement without consulting us, because it led to us getting a lot of hate when we had nothing to do with the decision.”Paul J. Browne, the vice president of Public Affairs and Communication, said “Fr. Jenkins consulted widely before making a decision about the murals.” While discussions about the murals have all but stopped, Collier said he still finds it hard to tell prospective Native students about the murals. “From my own experience, when Native students come on tour and when they visit us, they always want to come inside the Main Building and I struggle with telling them about the murals,” he said. “I get some harsh reactions on why Notre Dame would have something like that. There is some potential harm to our larger community in placing them in such a prominent spot.” Boyd said he did not know Notre Dame had such murals until his third week on campus. Knowing about the murals as a prospective student might have impacted his decision to attend Notre Dame, he said. “I grew up in a culture where Columbus was a symbol of colonialism, a symbol of extermination and forced conversion and exploitation,” Boyd said. “So, I think, coming here and seeing [the Columbus murals] would have certainly affected my decision. Who people admire says a lot about them.”The lack of representation for Native and Indigenous people is a problem that persists not only in the tri-campus community, but in the country as well. However, some strides are being made towards inclusivity, specifically with the Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum held on Aug. 19 in Sioux City, Iowa. Boyd, and other students from NASAND, were able to attend the forum, which was the first of its kind to place focus on Native issues.Tags: Christopher Columbus murals, culture, Father Jenkins, Father Sorin, Heritage, Indigenous, NAI, NASAND, native, Native Americanlast_img read more

Kraninger beefs up CFPB advisory committees, including CU Council

first_imgReversing a decision made by her predecessor, CFPB Director Kathy Kraninger announced Thursday that she intends to increase the role that advisory boards—including the Credit Union Advisory Council—play in agency decision-making.“I’ve seen firsthand how the Bureau benefits from the valuable input provided by committee members,” Kraninger said. “I have also seen how the joint committee meeting is resulting in members sharpening their ideas by engaging in a thorough dialogue.”The advisory groups include the Consumer Advisory Board, Academic Research Council Community Bank Advisory Council, and the Credit Union Advisory Council.Mulvaney disbanded the previous credit union advisory panel and fired its members in June, causing a huge controversy. At the same time, he disbanded community bank and consumer advisory panels. Members of those panels had been appointed by former CFPB Director Richard Cordray, who was a much more aggressive regulator than Mulvaney. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Son double sinks Villa to send Spurs fifth

first_imgLONDON: Son Heung-min struck a stoppage-time winner after a dreadful error from Bjorn Engels as Tottenham Hotspur won 3-2 at Aston Villa on Sunday to move up to fifth in the Premier League.In an enthralling match, Villa went ahead in the ninth minute when Spurs defender Toby Alderweireld turned an Anwar El Ghazi’s cross into his own net.But the Belgian center-half made amends for that mistake when he fired Tottenham back on level terms with a superb shot on the turn from inside the box.VAR intervened to award the visitors a penalty after reviewing a challenge on Steven Bergwijn by Villa defender Engels and ruling that he had brought down the Spurs forward.Son’s weak penalty, after a stuttering approach run, was saved by Pepe Reina but the South Korean was quickest to react as he bundled home the loose ball to send Spurs in ahead at the break.Then it was the turn of Engels to cancel out his error – the Belgian rising to meet a Jack Grealish corner and power in a header to make it 2-2.Villa’s Spanish keeper Reina made three fine saves to deny the impressive Son but the South Korean was to strike the decisive blow in the final moments of the game.Engels ended the match in despair as he mis-kicked a long ball forward and allowed Son to race clear and fire past Reina to take the three points.”We were 1-0 down so we showed our character and we didn’t give up. I felt bad because I had a couple of chances to score but I got the winning goal which makes me very happy and I think the lads deserved the win,” said Son.The defeat left Villa in 17th place, just a point above the relegation zone, but victory was a major boost for Spurs in their bid for Champions League qualification.Spurs are a point behind fourth-placed Chelsea, who host Manchester United on Monday.Fifth may be enough to secure Champions League football if second-placed Manchester City’s two-year ban from the competition is upheld.The ban was imposed by UEFA on Friday after an investigation into alleged breaches of Financial Fair Play rules but the club are appealing the decision. AgenciesAlso Read: Leander Paes has given a befitting farewell at Bengaluru OpenAlso Watch: BJP State President Ranjeet Dass lays foundation stone for erosion protection work at Safakamarlast_img read more