ND junior dies in video tower accident

first_imgJunior Declan Sullivan died Wednesday when a film tower fell over during football practice. He was 20. Those who knew him well remembered Sullivan, a resident of Fisher Hall, as fun-loving and outgoing. His rector, Fr. Robert Moss, said he remembers Sullivan “mostly just for his enthusiasm for everything he was involved in.” Originally from Long Grove, Ill., Sullivan was double majoring in marketing and Film, Television & Theatre. Sullivan was a contributor to The Observer’s Scene section. He was filming practice from a hydraulic scissorlift at the LaBar Practice Complex on the southeast side of campus when the tower fell around 4:50 p.m., according to a University press release. He worked as a videographer for the Department of Athletics. Sullivan was transported to Memorial Hospital in South Bend, where he later died. Junior Marc Anthony Rosa, who was a friend of Sullivan, said describing Sullivan was an “impossible task.” “He’s an unbelievably unique soul that, when you meet him, he’s completely addicting to be around. He’s nonstop energy. He’s like no one else you’ve ever met,” he said. “Although he may not be here, his soul is impossible to leave this campus and the people who’ve known him.” Moss said he arrived at the hospital after Sullivan died, and he anointed and blessed the body. “I was glad to be able to anoint the body,” he said. When Moss left the hospital, he said a University representative stayed with the body until family members arrived. Sullivan’s sister is a freshman Lewis Hall resident. Moss said he met with hall staff and gathered Fisher residents in the hall’s chapel at 8 p.m. to make the announcement. “Every chair was full,” he said. “He’ll be greatly missed.” Sullivan’s resident assistant Teddy Schaefer, a senior, said Sullivan was a “fun-loving guy, just a happy person. I’m in shock right now.” Moss presided over a standing-room-only Mass for Sullivan Wednesday night at 10:30 p.m. About 200 people attended the service in Fisher’s St. Paul Chapel. The Mass opened with the song “On Eagle’s Wings” and closed with the congregation singing the Alma Mater. Following the Mass, attendees processed to the Grotto, where about 150 students gathered and recited a decade of the rosary. Junior Kathryn Greenfield, a friend of Sullivan’s who was among the students at the Grotto, said Sullivan was the first male student she became friends with at Notre Dame. “He is the nicest, most easy-going [person], always has a smile on his face, always wants to have a good time,” she said. “Sweet person.” Junior Alex Karamol agreed and called Sullivan “a total sweetheart.” Greenfield and Karamol said they spent time sitting together in silence after hearing the news of Sullivan’s death, but also spent time telling stories about their friend. They recalled his signature facial expressions and phrases, and laughed while mimicking them for each other. Karamol said her favorite memory of Sullivan was when she was in a film he made his freshman year because she saw her easy-going friend being serious about his passion. “It was a different side of him,” she said. The University notified students of the death at 9 p.m. Wednesday in an e-mail signed by University President Fr. John Jenkins and Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Tom Doyle. “No words can convey the shock and grief we all are experiencing,” the e-mail said. “Declan was a well-liked, bright and enthusiastic film and marketing student and a valued member of the Notre Dame family. His death is a tremendous loss that will be felt very deeply and we share in your grief during this incredibly difficult time.” Head football coach Brian Kelly also released a statement Wednesday night. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to Declan’s family and friends,” he said. “Declan was a diligent student worker in our video department and had a tremendous personality and great sense of humor. He brightened the days for all that had the privilege to work with him, and the Notre Dame football family will dearly miss him.” Moss, who has been rector of Fisher Hall for 12 years and in education for almost 40 years, has faced student death in the past, and said it is always difficult. “It’s always a tragedy when a young person is called home to God,” he said. A Mass of Remembrance will be held in honor of Sullivan today at 10 p.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. The entire Notre Dame community is invited to attend, according to the e-mail sent to the student body. Douglas Farmer contributed to this report. SEE ALSO: http://www.ndsmcobserver.com/honoring-declan-1.1733173last_img read more

Peanut butter recalled over salmonella

first_imgConAgra Foods Inc. told consumers to discard certain jars of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter after the spread was linked to a salmonella outbreak that has sickened almost 300 people nationwide.Lids of jars with a product code beginning “2111” can be returned to ConAgra for a refund, the company said.The salmonella outbreak, which federal health officials said Wednesday has sickened 288 people in 39 states since August, was linked to tainted peanut butter produced by ConAgra at a plant in Sylvester, Ga. How salmonella got into peanut butter is still under investigation, said Dr. Mike Lynch, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC officials believe the salmonella outbreak to be the nation’s first stemming from peanut butter. The most cases were reported in New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee and Missouri.About 20 percent of all the ill were hospitalized, and there were no deaths, Lynch said. About 85 percent of the infected people said they ate peanut butter, CDC officials said.ConAgra officials said it was unsure why the CDC identified peanut butter as the source of the problem. Its own tests of its peanut butter and the plant have been negative, but it shut down the plant so it can investigate, spokesman Chris Kircher said.“We’re trying to understand what else we need to do or should be doing,” he said.Kircher called the recall a precaution. “We want to do what’s right by the consumer,” he said. ConAgra officials haven’t said how much peanut butter is covered in the recall. The Peter Pan brand is sold in 10 varieties, according to ConAgra’s Web site. The Great Value brand, which is also made by other companies, is a Wal-Mart brand.He said the CDC contacted the Food and Drug Administration, which sent investigators to the Georgia plant to review records, collect product samples and conduct tests for salmonella.Kircher said ConAgra makes peanut butter only at the Sylvester plant, for distribution nationwide.ConAgra randomly tests 60 to 80 jars of peanut butter that come off the line each day for salmonella and other pathogens, he said.“We’ve had no positive hits on that going back for years,” Kircher said.The plant itself is also regularly tested, he said, though he didn’t know how often. He said none of those tests have detected salmonella either.The latest outbreak began in August, with no more than two cases reported each day, CDC officials said. Only in the past few days did investigators hone in on peanut butter as a source, Lynch said.Other states reporting cases are Alaska, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin and West Virginia.Salmonella infection is known each year to sicken about 40,000 people in the United States, according to the CDC. Salmonellosis, as the infection is known, kills about 600 people annually.Symptoms can include diarrhea, fever, dehydration, abdominal pain and vomiting.The recall does not affect Great Value peanut butter made by other manufacturers, the FDA said.Shares of ConAgra stock rose 13 cents to $25.98 in morning trading on the New York Stock Exchange.165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more