House Passes Cybercrimes Act

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppKINGSTON, Oct. 14 (JIS): The Cybercrimes Act, which seeks to address computer specific offences, was passed in the House of Representatives on Tuesday (October 13) with two amendments.The new Act will replace the 2010 legislation, and incorporates new offences such as computer-related fraud or forgery; the use of computers for malicious communication; and unauthorised disclosure of investigation.It also addresses the use of the computer for malicious communication.Minister of State in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Julian Robinson, informed that the clause was included “because there is a new phenomenon called cyberbulling.”“This is where persons wilfully send messages, which are designed to annoy, and harass. The data that is sent must be obscene or is menacing in nature. The person sending the data does so intending to cause or is reckless as to whether the sending of the data causes annoyance, inconvenience or distress,” he explained.Opposition Spokesperson on Information Communications Technology (ICT), Dr. Andrew Wheately, while welcoming the provision to address cyberbulling, said the clause could have the effect of inhibiting use of information communications technology (ICT). “This section has the most far-reaching implications of this Act. The intention of this section is to no doubt reduce the incidence of cyberbullying, which we fully endorse. However, it seems to be completely oblivious to the level of sophistication of the layman technology user,” he said.I am sure that members on both sides of this House will agree that this section cannot stand as is. It cannot be that a person who…. makes a mistake while sending an email, text message or other correspondence could be charged with a crime,” he argued further.Mr. Robinson, in acknowledging the concerns, said Clause 9 Section 1 (b) is to be amended to state that a person commits an offence, if that person wilfully uses a computer to send to another person any data that is obscene or offensive.“I want to assure persons, who may send a message and they think that simply sending a message, which might be a joke, that you will be caught here. That is not what this provision is meant to deal with,” Mr. Robinson said. In closing the debate, Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining,Hon. Phillip Paulwell, noted that offences under the Bill require an act and intent.“We have been faithful to ensure that both aspects are provided for, so no innocent bystander will be caught by this. Nobody, who is engaged in doing ICT business, will be caught by this, as you must have intent to do some wrong and the onus is to establish that the intent has been proven,” Mr. Paulwell said.The legislation will now be sent to the Senate for its approval. Related Items:cybercrimes, dr. andrew wheately, house, passlast_img read more

5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Wednesday July 3 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Wednesday, July 3, 2019:#1) Fun On The Fourth BeginsWilmington Fun on the Fourth begins on the Town Common!Dinner6:00 PM – 8:00 PM Rotary Club, $8 (Cheeseburgers, Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, Baked Beans, Potato Salad, Cookies, Lemonade)Entertainment6:00 PM – 10:00 PM Carnival – Cushing Amusements6:00 PM – 9:00 PM Performance by “Groove Experience” (sponsored by Rotary)Events6:00 PM Horseshoes (First Round) (Participants must sign a Consent Form. Under 18 signed by a parent.)6:00 PM KanJam at HS tennis courts (Participants must sign a Consent Form. Under 18 must be signed by a parent.)6:30 PM Firecracker 5K Race $20 Entrance Fee, register here.7:00 PM Blueberry Pie Eating Contest (Participants must sign a Release of Liability Form. Under 18 signed by a parent.)#2) Device Drop-In At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Device Drop-In session from 2pm to 3pm. Have a tech question that’s been bugging you? Drop in the library to see if Technology Librarian, Brad McKenna, can help.#3) Book Store Next Door OpenThe Friends of the Wilmington Memorial Library’s Book Store Next Door (183 Middlesex Avenue) is open from 10am to 6pm (extended summer hours). All books are $2 or less! Every penny of every sale benefits the Wilmington Memorial Library. Learn more HERE.#4) Car Seat Installs At Public Safety BuildingThe Wilmington Police Department offers safety seat installs at the Wilmington Public Safety Building (1 Adelaide Street) every Wednesday, 10am-2pm. No appointment is necessary, but calling ahead at 978-658-5071 is recommended. Learn more HERE.#5) Town Beach Open The Town Beach is open today. Lifeguards are on duty from 10am to 8pm. Admission is FREE for residents. Proof of residency is required. Learn more HERE.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Friday, July 5, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”FUN ON THE FOURTH: What To Expect On Wednesday, July 3In “Community”FUN ON THE FOURTH: What To Expect On Friday, July 5In “Community”last_img read more

South Africans still battling for land reform

first_imgSouth African president Cyril Ramaphosa has vowed to “accelerate” land reform to fix the “grave historical injustices” suffered by the black majority during apartheid and colonialism ahead of elections expected next year.Here are the key facts of the hugely contentious land issue:Historical backgroundBlack South Africans were dispossessed of their land during three centuries of colonialism and apartheid which officially ended in 1994.”The extent to which black people were dispossessed of lands in South Africa was greater than in any other African country,” said Ruth Hall, a land expert at the Plaas Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies.The indigenous land act passed in 1913 awarded the black majority just 13 percent of land — described by Ramaphosa as the “original sin”.When the ruling African National Congress (ANC) came to power in 1994 on the back of the victorious anti-apartheid struggle, the government pledged to redistribute 30 percent of South Africa’s 60,000 commercial farms to black ownership. Twenty-four years later and only eight percent are in black hands.Poor progress since 1994A recent report into the issue led by former president Kgalema Motlanthe painted a picture of the “slow and ineffective pace of land reform”.The failure was framed as being down to the state’s lack of resources — the issue of land reform accounts for only 0.4 percent of national expenditure.Even more serious obstacles to land reform are “corruption by officials… lack of political will, and lack of training and capacity”, according to Motlanthe’s report.Following 1994, two land restitution programmes were launched and received a total of 223,000 requests for redistribution — but only 25 percent of those have been handled.At that rate, it would take 188 years to process all the applications, according to Hall, the academic.- Urban-rural divide -A goal of land reform is to end the disparities in both rural areas and urban locations which are home to 62 percent of South Africans.In 2018, most towns were still organised along apartheid lines — non-white townships characterised by limited infrastructure and high unemployment isolated from the leafy, largely white suburbs where economic opportunities are abundant.”This is the remnant of the apartheid social setting for us as black and coloured that we have to travel” hours to work, said Nkosikhona Swaartbooi of the Ndifuna Ukwazi organisation which fights for equal access to land in South Africa’s cities.Ramaphosa appears fully aware of the battle that lays ahead.”We are working to ensure that the urban poor can own and occupy land close to places of work, social services and education,” he said recently.Expropriation without compensationThe issue of whether to take land without compensating its current owners is by far the most divisive and emotive issue facing modern South Africa.Until now the government has pursued a policy of willing buyer, willing seller to allow land transfers.But in February lawmakers voted to establish a commission charged with re-writing the constitution to allow for forcible land transfers without compensation.Since then AfriForum, a group that advocates for its largely white membership, has reacted with fury.”Property rights are the cornerstones of economic development,” said the group.The war of words between AfriForum and the government even drew the attention of Australia whose interior minister appealed for South Africa’s “persecuted” white minority to move down-under.It is also debated whether the government needs to change the constitution with players like Motlanthe insisting it should simply make greater use of its existing powers.Observers have suggested constitutional reform is an electoral ploy by the ANC to win votes, which has faced political pressure from the radical leftist Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party in recent years.Another Zimbabwe?Some white South African farmers fear the new policies puts the country at risk of emulating Zimbabwe where their counterparts were ejected from their land wholesale from the year 2000 by Robert Mugabe.Those land seizures plunged Zimbabwe into a deep economic crisis from which the country has yet to recover.But in South Africa, the EFF has already begun orchestrating illegal land grabs, stepping up its campaign in recent months and leading to clashes between police and squatters.”We will not make the mistakes (of) others,” Ramaphosa vowed recently. “We will not allow smash-and-grab interventions,” he added, promising the policies would not hurt the economy.last_img read more