Arsenal v Chelsea line-ups: Fabregas returns, youngster on bench, Giroud decision

first_imgCesc Fabregas starts for the first time in the Premier League this season against his former club.The Spain midfielder replaces Oscar, who drops to the bench.Skipper John Terry had already been ruled out, so David Luiz is confirmed as Gary Cahill’s centre-back partner. Branislav Ivanovic takes the armband.Among the Blues substitutes are Marcos Alonso and Nathaniel Chalobah.Arsenal name the same side which won at Hull last weekend, with striker Olivier Giroud returning to the squad but only named on the bench.Alexis Sanchez starts up front, while Petr Cech is in goal against his former club. Arsenal: Cech; Bellerin, Mustafi, Koscielny, Monreal; Coquelin, Cazorla; Walcott, Ozil, Iwobi; Sanchez.Subs: Ospina, Gibbs, Holding, Xhaka, Oxlade-Chamberlain, Perez, Giroud.Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Cahill, Luiz, Azpilicueta; Kante; Willian, Matic, Fabregas, Hazard; Costa.Subs: Begovic, Alonso, N. Chalobah, Oscar, Moses, Pedro, Batshuayi. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Leafs’ Auston Matthews, Mitch Marner share Patrick Marleau stories

first_imgTORONTO — Auston Matthews famously pulled off a Toronto Maple Leafs sweater at NHL All-Star Weekend in San Jose in January, revealing a No. 12 Patrick Marleau jersey underneath to the delight of the Sharks fans in attendance.But Matthews’ favorite memories of being Marleau’s teammate for two seasons came away from the spotlight, the times on the road or when Patrick and his wife, Christina, would have him and other Leafs players over on special occasions to hang out with their four boys.“He …last_img

Phenomenal Fossils

first_img(Visited 32 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Recent fossil discoveries include some eye-openers and world records.Ever herd of dinosaurs? Alaska is turning out to be a world-class dinosaur track site. Science Magazine discussed the finding of thousands of tracks in Denali National Park made by a herd of duckbill dinosaurs (hadrosaurs). “The consistent and excellent preservation of tracks suggests all the footprints were created within a short time period,” reporter Sid Perkins says. The tracks included all ages, juvenile to adult. “The presence of juveniles in the herd also strongly hints that these creatures spent their entire lives in the Arctic, the team says; hadrosaurs of that size wouldn’t have had the size or stamina to migrate to and from warmer climates during wintertime, as some scientists have proposed.” Becky Oskin at Live Science noted that “Many of the deep tracks contain preserved skin and ‘nail’ impressions from the plant-eating hadrosaurs.” The tracks were first discovered in 2007 but were described in Geology in June, sources say.Biggest bird: The largest bird fossil ever found was an albatross-like giant with a 24-foot wingspan, Science Daily says. Found near Charleston, South Carolina, Pelagornis sandersi unquestionably flew, even though Live Science says its size exceeds theoretical limits according to some researchers. It was so big, it may have had to catch winds or jump off bluffs to get airborne. The find, much larger than today’s biggest bird, the California condor, was published in PNAS, where the researchers say it had twice the wingspan of the Royal Albatross. Science Magazine, with its large artwork of the bird, says the wingspan exceeds the length of a stretch limousine. The BBC News and National Geographic also reported the find. New Scientist may have the biggest “Wow!” factor, though, showing that even this bird’s wingspan was significantly smaller than that of the extinct pterosaur, Quetzalcoatlus northropi.Mammoth CT scan: Two baby mammoths were scanned with computerized tomography for the first time, PhysOrg reported, yielding a “trove of insights” about internal details. Researchers determined that the young mammoths died from asphyxiation by inhaling mud. It required a mammoth-sized industrial scanner at a Ford testing facility in Michigan to fit these baby giants. Embedded video clips and photos in the article allow readers to view the skeletons in 3-D.Resurrected spider: A CT scan on a much smaller organism—an extinct spider—has allowed engineers to reconstruct its locomotion. Readers of a BBC News article can see the dead live again in a virtual 3-D reconstruction video clip.Amber alert: Chinese scientists looked into a crystal of Fushun amber and found a “diverse paleobiota,” Current Biology reported. “Biotic interchange occurred between Europe and Asia during the Early Paleogene” is one of the published highlights of the examination. Some “Twenty-two orders and more than 80 families of arthropods have been reported so far, making it among the most diverse amber biotas,” they say. “Some insect taxa have close phylogenetic affinities to those from coeval European ambers,” indicating a good deal of foreign exchange in the period.DiNObird debate: Alan Feduccia and Stephen Czerkas, longstanding critics of the dinosaur-to-bird transition, have published their analysis of Scansoriopteryx, arguing that it does not support the consensus view (Science Daily). They believe that both birds and theropods descended from a common ancestor farther back in time. Readers can make their own decisions about the merits of both sides. As for Scansoriopteryx, “The birdlike fossil is actually not a dinosaur, as previously thought, but much rather the remains of a tiny tree-climbing animal that could glide,” they argue.Early man in trouble: Paleoanthropologists are fretting again (what else is new?) over another skull that “raises new questions about human evolution” – that’s Astrobiology Magazine‘s headline, a NASA website that usually doesn’t get into paleoanthropology. Echoing what was reported by Science Daily and Live Science, the article puzzles over a Neanderthal-like ear trait in a non-Neanderthal skull found in China 35 years ago but just subjected to a micro-CT scan.“The discovery places into question a whole suite of scenarios of later Pleistocene human population dispersals and interconnections based on tracing isolated anatomical or genetic features in fragmentary fossils,” said study co-author Erik Trinkaus, PhD, a physical anthropology professor at Washington University in St. Louis.“It suggests, instead, that the later phases of human evolution were more of a labyrinth of biology and peoples than simple lines on maps would suggest.”The fossil also indicates a great deal of interbreeding between ancient humans. In fact, that’s what John Brookfield in The Conversation argues gave living Tibetans their “head for heights”—Neanderthal genes. It would seem any story is up for grabs since the timeline of human origins keeps getting revised (e.g., Science Daily).Once again, we find greater sizes and more diversity in the past than present, and indications of very different climate. The biosphere was drastically changed because of the Flood. So much of the confusion interpreting fossils would evaporate if moyboy paleontologists would just kick the bad habit of dragging everything out over millions of years.last_img read more

Basic Education Committee condemns burning of schools in Limpopo

first_imgParliament’s Portfolio Committee on Basic Education has expressed its concern and condemns in the strongest possible terms the burning of schools and infrastructure in Vuwani, Limpopo, during recent protest action.Committee Chairperson Ms Nomalungelo Gina said the community needs to take cognisance of the education of the learners. “The destruction and burning of state property will not resolve the issue. The only parties that are disadvantaged are the learners who are not receiving teaching at the moment.”She said the community has every right to protest, but this should not include the destruction of infrastructure. “This is a school term in which all learners will be writing exams and learners need the educational support and teaching they can get. Protesters should be mindful of the effect this will have on Grade 12 learners, who in the next few months will have to sit for their final examinations. Protesters should remember it is their children, cousins and neighbours who will be negatively affected by this action.”The Committee has urged all interested parties, traditional leaders, community leaders, education officials and law enforcement authorities to speedily reach a solution to address the matter so that the education of these learners can continue.For media enquiries or interviews with the Chairperson, please contact:Rajaa Azzakani (Ms)Parliamentary Communication ServicesTel: 021 403 8437Cell: 081703 9542E-mail: razzakani@parliament.gov.zalast_img read more

SA to sing new Freedom song, dance

first_img25 April 2014 South Africans will celebrate Freedom Day with a specially commissioned new song and dance, which will be performed for the first time during the official event at the Union Buildings in Pretoria on Sunday. President Jacob Zuma will make a special address at the event, which will also include a multi-cultural carnival, a South African Air Force salute flight and air display, a South African Airways fly-past and a free afternoon programme of music and dance. The Department of Arts and Culture has appointed renowned choreographer and dancer Somizi Mhlongo to create the Freedom Dance, which will be performed live by Mhlongo and his fellow dancers as part of the formal morning programme on Sunday. “The dance is inspired by various high points in the past 20 years and includes the dance moves of the iconic late former president Nelson Mandela as well as encompassing his raised fist after his release, thobela dance moves and others,” the department said in a statement on Friday. The video of a special new song will also be played during Sunday’s celebrations. “The song is a re-work of the Peace Song penned by the legendary Sello Chicco Twala and accompanied by younger artists,” the department said, adding that the refrain of the song, “South Africa, we love you, our beautiful land”, was as relevant and inspiring today as it was two decades ago. Sunday’s events will begin with interfaith prayers at Freedom Park outside Pretoria, followed by a cultural street parade starting in Sunnyside, Pretoria at around 7am and leading into the south lawns of the Union Buildings at around 9.30am, after which the formal programme will commence. Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

Exciting Website Changes and New Features

first_imgSportingPulse is pleased to announce that on Tuesday March 24 (2009) a number of exciting changes and new features will be made to your Sportzware Website. It’s important that you read the communications available to you and learn about these changes. Not only are they exciting, but they add more functionality and help to fully optimise your website.SportingPulse has produced a communication outlining these changes and also put together a user guide on all of the new features, both of which are available by clicking on this link (please refer to the Australia/New Zealand changes);http://supportwiki.sportingpulse.com/index.php/Summary_of_v7_Changes_and_Enhancements_(March_2009)Should you have any questions please contact SportingPulse atsupport@sportingpulse.comWe trust you will enjoy using these new features and like the updated changes to your website.Related Filessportzware_website_changes_on-2-pdflast_img read more

10 months agoBarcelona ace Messi: I want to work again with Guardiola

first_imgBarcelona ace Messi: I want to work again with Guardiolaby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona ace Leo Messi admits he’d like to again work with Manchester City boss Pep Guardiola.Guardiola and Messi won the Champions League together at Barca.And Messi’s latest comments could give fans slight hope that they may see him in a City shirt after all, even if he was hinting at a reunion at the Nou Camp.He told Marca: “Although it is difficult, I would like to work with Guardiola again. He is one of the best coaches in the world.”That’s why I would like [him to come back], but I’m telling you that I see it as complicated.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

10 months agoFather admits big transfer interest for Sampdoria defender Joachim Andersen

first_imgFather admits big transfer interest for Sampdoria defender Joachim Andersenby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveThe father of Sampdoria defender Joachim Andersen admits there’s growing transfer interest in the Dane.Jacob Andersen also acts as the Danish international’s representative.“I have been to many meetings, as Joachim is wanted by the top six clubs in Italy and England,” he told Ekstra Bladet.“I am not thinking about a January move and neither is Joachim. He is fine where he is now, although naturally if a big club were to request a meeting, we wouldn’t turn it down.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img